Jan 29 2023

Magnetic Fields as Effecting Coulomb Groups

An electric field of an electromagnetic wave does the work to extend the magnetic field of the same wave. What makes the electric field turn around must have something to do with running out of energy to extend the magnetic field further. Griffiths says: “Magnetic forces do no work” ([1], pg. 207), and that is why it is said that transmission of the Coulomb field is “a diffeomorphism on the electric fields of the gamma rays”:

https://www.fruechtetheory.com/blog/2022/03/29/transmission-of-the-coulomb-field/

Magnetic fields can act as guides however, and can help hold together a groupoid in the gamma ray field so it can act transitively. There is “energy stored in the magnetic field” ([1], pg. 317] and “Magnetic forces may alter the direction in which a particle moves, but they cannot speed it up or slow it down.” ([1], pg. 207) It is the same in Coulomb groups, spherical or concentrated, that carry the Coulomb field, – there are electric currents that are altered in direction by magnetic fields. Another example of this is gravitational lensing.

An involution may be a charged particle, or nucleus, with mass, as it absorbs gravitons for the energy to send out Coulomb groups, or it may be a Coulomb group itself in an open field. As a spherical group travels, for example, it takes on new gamma rays and leaves some behind, and the new gamma rays may be called an involution as they become part of the Coulomb group.

When it is said that with Coulomb phonon transmission, the gamma rays are “frozen in time” up to “10 meters at least”:

https://www.fruechtetheory.com/blog/2022/03/29/transmission-of-the-coulomb-field/ ,

it is in relation to travel, though they may travel a miniscule amount. It is torsion that transmits the Coulomb field, and the angular velocity, ω, is higher the stronger the field.

In a Cartan decomposition, “g1 = t1 + p1 and g2 = t2 + p2“ ([2], pg.517), p is the peak point of the electric field of a graviton. In a Riemannian globally symmetric space of type I, p follows the peak of a sine wave, and it also follows the peak in a Riemannian globally symmetric space of type II.

[1] Griffiths, David J., “Introduction to Electrodynamics”, Prentice Hall, 1999

[2] Helgason, Sigurdur, “Differential Geometry, Lie Groups, and Symmetric Spaces”, American Mathematical Society, 2012

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